Worldwide coronavirus cases cross 17.85 million - GulfToday

Worldwide coronavirus cases cross 17.85 million

Virus-Police

The photo has been used for illustrative purposes.

More than 17.85 million people have been reported to be infected by the novel coronavirus globally and 683,767 have died, according to a Reuters tally published on Sunday, August 2nd.

Infections have been reported in more than 210 countries and territories since the first cases were identified in China in December 2019.


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WHO warns of drawn out coronavirus pandemic

Night curfew in Melbourne; Victoria state declares disaster after 671 new cases


Russia reported 5,427 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Sunday, bringing its nationwide tally to 850,870, the fourth largest caseload in the world.

Russia's coronavirus taskforce said 70 people had died over the last 24 hours, pushing the official death toll in the country of around 145 million people to 14,128.

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A doctor observes through a glass window the condition of the patient in a ward in Moscow, Russia. AP

The Australian state of Victoria declared a state of disaster and authorities in Vietnam said they would test the entire population of a city for the coronavirus -- reflecting worries around the world about getting the disease under control.

The top Democrats in Congress are not close to a deal with the White House to pump more money into the US economy to ease the coronavirus' heavy toll, both sides said on Saturday, after an essential lifeline for millions of unemployed Americans expired.

The coronavirus death toll in Latin America passed 200,000 on Saturday night, a Reuters tally showed, underlining the region's status as one of the global epicenters of the pandemic.

Major League Baseball (MLB) postponed Saturday's game and Sunday's double-header between the St. Louis Cardinals and Milwaukee Brewers after initial rapid tests showed another player and "multiple" staff on the Cardinals may have COVID-19.

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Police conduct roadside checks on the outskirts of Melbourne. File/AFP

Australia's second-most populous state of Victoria declared a state of disaster on Sunday and imposed a nightly curfew for the capital Melbourne as part of its harshest movement restrictions to date to contain a resurgent COVID-19.

Vietnam's coastal city of Danang plans to test its entire population of 1.1 million people for coronavirus, the governing authorities said on Saturday, as 40 new cases linked to the tourist hot spot were reported across the country.

The Philippines' health department said on Sunday it would update its COVID-19 game plan within a week and sought to beef up the healthcare workforce in the capital Manila, where medical frontliners are calling for reviving strict lockdowns.

Seven Chinese health officials were due to arrive in Hong Kong on Sunday, the first members of a 60-person team that will carry out widespread testing for COVID-19 in the territory as the city races to halt a third wave of illness.

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Police officers stand next to demonstrators during a protest against the restrictions in Berlin. Reuters

Thousands marched in Berlin on Saturday to protest against coronavirus restrictions in Germany, saying they violated people's rights and freedoms.

Russia reported 5,427 new cases on Sunday, bringing its nationwide tally to 850,870, the fourth largest caseload in the world.

Two thirds of British businesses say they are now "fully operational" after the coronavirus lockdown, up from half in June, according to a survey on Sunday.

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A passenger has their temperature taken before riding on the London Eye wheel in London. Toby Melville/Reuters

Marathon Petroleum plans to permanently close two small US oil refineries in Martinez, California, and Gallup, New Mexico, the company said, eliminating 800 jobs in response to lower fuels demand.

LATAM Airlines will fire "at least" 2,700 workers in Brazil, including pilots, its Brazilian arm said on Saturday, as the bankrupt carrier struggles to cut costs and cope with an industry collapse due to the pandemic.

Reuters

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