Libya truce holds despite reports of violations by both sides - GulfToday

Libya truce holds despite reports of violations by both sides

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In this photo shows debris covers the ground and an emergency vehicle after an airstrike in Tajoura, Libya. File photo/AP

Both of Libya's warring factions accused each other of violating a ceasefire proposed by Turkey and Russia, as fighting continued around the capital, Tripoli, on Sunday.

Libya's rival governments committed to an internationally brokered truce that took effect on Sunday.

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The country’s UN-supported government said that it had recorded "violations” of the ceasefire minutes after it was supposed to take effect in the early hours of Sunday.

The government did not specify what kind of violations in its written statement.

Meanwhile, a general for the opposing east-based forces said that his lines had also been targeted by several missiles.

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Commander Khalifa Haftar greets to the journalists. File photo

Brigadier General Khaled Al Mahjoub, who is in charge of mobilizing the east-based forces, said that some battalions had been the subject of "random” incoming shells. He said that the attacks were not large enough to warrant a response.

Truce comes as Libya is on the brink of a major escalation, with foreign backers of the rival Libyan governments stepping up their involvement in the oil-rich nation's conflict.

It also comes amid a broader diplomatic push for a political solution to Libya’s war, which has crippled the country for more than seven years.

The war has displaced hundreds of thousands and left more than a million in need of humanitarian aid, according to the United Nations.

The United Nations and European powers, along with Libya's allies in the region, have been calling for a peace summit to happen in Berlin early this year that would bring together the leaders of the rival governments, and possibly move the country closer to nationwide elections.

But it's proven difficult to stop fighting on the ground.

Agencies