7 of 10 Filipinos fear rise of Chinese workers - GulfToday

7 of 10 Filipinos fear rise of Chinese workers

China-Workers

Photo has been used for illustrative purposes.

Manolo B. Jara

Seven out of 10 Filipinos, or 70 percent, have expressed  alarm and fear over the increasing number of Chinese  workers who pose not only a threat to their employment opportunities but also endanger the country’s security, according to just released  findings of a private pollster.

Social Weather Stations (SWS) reported that 31 percent “worried a great deal” while 39 percent are “somewhat worried” in the  survey it conducted  nationwide from Sept.27 to 30 that involved face to face interviews with 1,800 adult respondents.

The proportion of those worried about the increasing number of Chinese workers in the country was highest in Metro Manila at 75 percent, followed by the Visayas in Central Philippines at 71 percent, the rest of Luzon  at 60 percent and Mindanao at 65 percent, SWS disclosed.

It added that about half of the respondents agreed that the increasing number of Chinese workers also posed a threat to national security with Metro Manila again posting the highest at 38 percent, followed by the rest of Luzon, 21 percent; Mindanao, 21 percent; and Visayas 16 percent.

Reports earlier said that more than three million Chinese nationals have entered the country since President Rodrigo “Rody” Duterte assumed office in 2016 and announced a major foreign policy shift for lesser dependence on its long-time ally the US in favour of more friendly ties with Beijing and Russia.

In particular, Congressman Joey Salceda of Albay province in the Bicol Region estimated that 300,000 of the Chinese workers were employed by Philippine offshore gaming operations (Pogo) run by Chinese nationals.

Of the 300,000, however, only 100,000 to 120,000 have work permits from the Department of Labour and Employment that enabled them to work for 60 “legal” Pogos with permits from the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (Pagcor), said Salceda, the chairman of the powerful Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives.

In this light, Salceda and other House leaders have filed a bill to tax offshore gambling operators and their mostly foreign workers.

But Salvador Panelo, the presidential spokesman, said they were not only surprised by the SWS findings but also minced no words in claiming that  the questions posed  could have been slanted to “favor critics.”

Panelo questioned the methodology used especially the question  posed to the respondents in Filipino, thus: “How worried are you about the increasing number of of foreign Chinese working here in the Philippines?”

Manolo B. JaraSeven out of 10 Filipinos, or 70 percent, have expressed  alarm and fear over the increasing number of Chinese  workers who pose not only a threat to their employment opportunities but also endanger the country’s security, according to just released  findings of a private pollster.

Social Weather Stations (SWS) reported that 31 percent “worried a great deal” while 39 percent are “somewhat worried” in the  survey it conducted  nationwide from Sept.27 to 30 that involved face to face interviews with 1,800 adult respondents.

The proportion of those worried about the increasing number of Chinese workers in the country was highest in Metro Manila at 75 percent, followed by the Visayas in Central Philippines at 71 percent, the rest of Luzon  at 60 percent and Mindanao at 65 percent, SWS disclosed.

It added that about half of the respondents agreed that the increasing number of Chinese workers also posed a threat to national security with Metro Manila again posting the highest at 38 percent, followed by the rest of Luzon, 21 percent; Mindanao, 21 percent; and Visayas 16 percent.

Reports earlier said that more than three million Chinese nationals have entered the country since President Rodrigo “Rody” Duterte assumed office in 2016 and announced a major foreign policy shift for lesser dependence on its long-time ally the US in favour of more friendly ties with Beijing and Russia.

In particular, Congressman Joey Salceda of Albay province in the Bicol Region estimated that 300,000 of the Chinese workers were employed by Philippine offshore gaming operations (Pogo) run by Chinese nationals.

Of the 300,000, however, only 100,000 to 120,000 have work permits from the Department of Labour and Employment that enabled them to work for 60 “legal” Pogos with permits from the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (Pagcor), said Salceda, the chairman of the powerful Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives.

In this light, Salceda and other House leaders have filed a bill to tax offshore gambling operators and their mostly foreign workers.

But Salvador Panelo, the presidential spokesman, said they were not only surprised by the SWS findings but also minced no words in claiming that  the questions posed  could have been slanted to “favor critics.”

Panelo questioned the methodology used especially the question  posed to the respondents in Filipino, thus: “How worried are you about the increasing number of of foreign Chinese working here in the Philippines?”