Classifieds | Archives | Jobs | About TGT | Contact | Subscribe
 | 
Last updated 6 hours, 16 minutes ago
Printer Friendly Version | TGT@Twitter | RSS Feed |
HOME LOCAL MIDEAST ASIA WORLD BUSINESS SPORT OPINION WRITERS
Educationists talk on adaptability, personalised learning
BY MATOVU ABDALLAH TWAHA February 13, 2018
 Print    Send to Friend

DUBAI: A student who exhibits empathy and kindness, “values that can be learnt,” to others is “far more likely to succeed in life physically, financially and being less prone to engage in criminal behaviour,” said a psychologist from a US institution, the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

“Maintaining positive outlook, empathy and kindness are part of concentration and are connected to longevity, said Dr Richard Davidson, the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

While presenting a lecture titled “Teaching for Adaptability,’ he concentrated on what shapes well-being which he said is “not a static ‘thing’ – but a set of skills that can be learned and cultivated over time, just like learning to play a musical instrument or riding a bike.

He mentioned four components that can be learned to attain well-being: awareness which constitutes focus and attention; concentration (empathy and kindness); I sight (self-knowledge), and purpose (clear direction and knowing that life has meaning).

“Training focus and attention is the building block for every form of learning,” said the founder and director of the Center for Healthy Minds. “These qualities help to predict the quality of life.

“Rather than pitching a fixed scientific definition of well-being, we’re constantly unearthing clues and evidence about how well-being manifests itself in the mind and body.” He said that having a strong purpose of life is critical for well-being and it is also a major reason for longevity.

Earlier, the Founder of AltSchool, Max Ventilla, had made a case for designing personalised leaning which he said personalises activities, encourages feedback and engages parents. “This model enables every child to attain his potential, and that it is the sure way for future educationing.”

He said technology displaces human interaction, that is why many parents now crave for a better school of a hundred years than the average school of today, yet they would opt for an average hospital of now than the better one of a hundred years ago; “despite that the quality of an individual doctor matters as well.”

He also said that motivation of the student, rather than engagement, should be the primary concern.
 

Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Comments
 
Post a comment
 
Name:
Country:
City:
Email:
Comment:
 
    
    
Related Stories
Sharjah hospital, Ajman charity sign MoU
SHARJAH: University Hospital Sharjah (UHS), a leading healthcare provider, in the region has always placed the welfare of patients at its forefront. To take forward their..
Girl guides learn leadership skills
SHARJAH: Members of Sharjah Girl Guides have taken part in a two-day boot camp, ‘Fakhrana’ (Our Pride), in cooperation with Sharjah Police Headquarters to enhance the gir..
American University of Sharjah joins international Tiny House movement
SHARJAH: Faculty and students at the American University of Sharjah (AUS) have unveiled a “Tiny House” on campus, showcasing the latest research in sustainable and enviro..
AUS professor awarded prestigious Fulbright Scholarship
SHARJAH: Marcus Farr, a faculty member of the College of Architecture, Art and Design (CAAD) at American University of Sharjah (AUS), has been named a 2019 Fulbright Scho..
Nine academic programmes launched at ADU
ABU DHABI: Abu Dhabi University (ADU) on Tuesday announced the launch of nine new Bachelor’s and Masters programmes for the 2018 semester in line with its sustained commi..
FRONTPAGE
 
GALLERY
 
PANORAMA
 
TIME OUT
 
SPORT
 
 
Advertise | Copyright