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HOME LOCAL MIDEAST ASIA WORLD BUSINESS SPORT OPINION WRITERS
Writers
March 21, 2010
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Aysha Taryam
History cannot remain masculine
Published on June 10, 2018 | Opinion
History is a past retold, a series of events that have been documented by those who have witnessed their occurrence. It is human nature to write of that which interests us, of facts that are deemed essential at the time of inscription and that is why history as is documented, is as much an interpretation, as it is a collection of facts. The names and events that have made it into history books have changed the world one way or the other, their existence and our knowledge of it is essential, but what of those names that were never uttered by history teachers, are their world-altering actions erased? Or do their trials and tribulations factor into the shaping of the future whether they are remembered or not?

 
 
Shaadaab S. Bakht
Published on October 19, 2018 | Panorama
When in power the burden of ethical inviolability becomes heavier because they who bear the baton, and wish to wield it, cannot afford to step out of line with the values of governance such people are expected to protect. But the opposite often happens and will happen because authority, like a teenager’s fantasy, tends to generate a sense of harmful disregard for reason.

   
 
Michael Jansen


Bigger than expected

Published on October 19, 2018 | Opinion

Amman sprawls over nine hills and surrounding desert. It is a city of white stone-clad villas and apartment blocks. Blue-tinted glass towers reach for the sky while skeletal yellow cranes stand over unfinished buildings. Late model and luxury cars drive from district to district with pauses for eight traffic circles. Jams slow progress day and night. Five star hotels have sprouted up everywhere, including many from top global chains.




 
Sarah Taryam
Bio | Past Articles  Follow on Twitter
Best of the best
Published on October 19, 2018 | Panorama
It has been an interesting, busy year in terms of the amount and diversity of movies that have been released so far. With only two and a half months left until the end of the year, we are taking a look back at some of the best titles that have been released so far. Director Xavir Beauvois’ movie The Guardians has been described as an “epic” melodrama by critics. The film centres around the first world war and the conflict that its characters had to endure as they struggled to maintain a family farm in France.

  
 
Dr. Lamya N. Fawwaz
Posted on March 29, 2016 | Opinion
The world is facing a changing global reality. Oil prices continue to lag, and leading international economists like Morgan Stanley say prices will fall further before they can begin to rise. Additionally, global economic activity will soon feel the effects of efforts to reduce global climate change. This challenging situation places the UAE at a unique juncture to accelerate its economic transformation efforts while offsetting the impact of shrinking hydrocarbon returns.

 
 
Dubai Abulhoul
Children’s Right to Privacy
Posted on August 9, 2018 | Opinion
If there’s any lesson that my third grade computer teacher made sure my classmates and I remembered by heart, it is this: do not share any personal information online. Little did my teacher know that she was addressing a group of seven-year -olds that would, in a matter of a few years, become the generation that shared more personal information in public than any generation before it in history.

   
 
Khalid Al Ameri
What Emirati men can learn from Emirati women
Posted on August 28, 2016 | Opinion
“Beware men lest women deprive you of leadership positions.”
 
His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai

 
 
 
Alia Al Hazami
Separating the Art from the Artist: Johnny Depp & Fantastic Beasts
Posted on October 9, 2018 | Opinion
One of the greatest ethical challenges one may face is being forced to choose between something they love, and something they stand for. For several months, I have been overthinking what may seem like a silly little debacle to others. But to me, it is a huge ethical decision. I am a very huge fan of Harry Potter. JK Rowling’s decision to continue the magic with ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ was absolutely thrilling. However, as a woman, my heart sunk when the last scene showed Johnny Depp on the screen.

 

 
Sara Al Mheiri
A hairy hoot
Posted on February 13, 2014 | Panorama
“Please stop moving,” she said with gritted teeth, her patience clearly running out. I didn’t care though. She wasn’t the one in absolute agony. My legs were crossed so tightly and nails dug deep into the arm rests but that didn’t stop my head suddenly flinching from the pain as I yelped. She sighed loudly and undid the braid once more. This was the third time in a row that she has been braiding the same piece of hair. But when I say braid, I mean really yanking the hair practically out of the root to make sure it stands the test of time.

  
 
Hiba Essa Al Ateek
Strolling out
Posted on September 16, 2016 | Opinion
Today is the day I take my six month  old twins out for the first time on my own. I decide to go to the Galarie Lafayette to shop. Very daring for my first trip, my friends think. I feel optimistic and proud of myself as we take the elevator and walk to the bus stop five minutes away.

  
 
Fatma Mohammed Al Saleh
The Temple Run
Posted on October 17, 2014 | Panorama
It was just another day. Strolling back towards what I called home for this month. It’s more of a house. There seemed to be no kind of emotional attachment. Rather I might have wanted to distance myself from it. For it was empty of all the love, craziness, and long sleepless fun nights I spent back home. Walking through that door made me homesick. Literally sick. It’s not that I didn’t like the girls there; on the contrary I saw many potential friendships.

 

 
Sula Powell
Last but not least
Posted on August 9, 2016 | Panorama
Two years and thirty plus, slightly melodramatic student drama scenarios and fabulous food related articles later, my time at university in the UAE has officially expired. I am hectically trying to convince myself it is a lie and I will be in Dubai forever and ever, just not particularly consolidated in terms of legitimacy when the Emirates flight reminders flash up every other day! I predict as soon as I am in Scottish airspace cue an extreme crying face x 1000 and induced S.A.D (seasonal affective disorder) and potentially a case of vitamin D deficiency.

 

 
PV Vivekanand
Published on September 23, 2012 | Opinion
The UN Security Council appears to be headed for US-engineered military intervention to root out militants linked to Al Qaeda who have seized control of Mali’s northern region. On Friday, the Security Council called on the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) – a bloc of West African countries – to submit a detailed plan for military intervention in Mali. Presumably, the plan would call for establishment of a military force that will be supported by the African Union and the United Nations.

 

 
Saibal Chatterjee
Dynamism and depth
Published on September 7, 2018 | Panorama
A slew of new titles that cut a wide swathe in terms of themes, concerns and styles represents Arab cinema in the 43rd edition of the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF, Sept.6 to 16), testifying to the sustained dynamism and depth of filmmaking in the region. At one end of the spectrum, veteran Algerian filmmaker Merzak Allouache’s latest work world premieres in the festival’s Masters sidebar; at the other, Palestinian writer-director Bassam Jarbawi will bring the curtains down on the Discovery section with his debut feature.

 

 
Tanya Khoury
Bio | Past Articles  Follow on Twitter
Published on May 23, 2014 | Panorama
Imagine my delight after finding out that The Grand Budapest Hotel was on again at the cinema. I really didn’t know what to think – was it a prank? I had to make sure. I bought my ticket online and called the theatre twice to make certain that when I got there the film would still be on. I hurried down to the cinema, bought my wonderfully mixed popcorn and ran into the theatre smiling from ear to ear. Come to think of it, that whole scene must have looked very peculiar from the outside in. No matter, Wes Anderson’s highly awaited film was on and I couldn’t really care about my facial expression as I ran up the escalator to the cinema door.

   

 
Abdalla M. Taryam
Bio | Past Articles  Follow on Twitter
The Socialist Republic of UAE Football
Published on October 7, 2012 | Opinion
We can all agree that the United States strives to become a pure capitalist market. Most of their laws, financial decisions and even election campaigns revolve around capitalism. Nonetheless, there is a sector in the land of freedom that is far from pure capitalism and bordering on socialist practices: Sport. Survival of the fittest, or the richest is the adopted motto in sport. Less so in individual sport, we are witnessing the power of money dominating the entire world of team sport.

  

 
Sultan Saeed Al Darmaki
Bio | Past Articles  Follow on Twitter
A laughing matter
Published on November 30, 2012 | Panorama

  

 
Hichem Karoui
Bio | Past Articles  Follow on Twitter
Hullabaloo about EU move
Published on July 21, 2013 | Opinion
A serious crisis is shaking the relationship between the European Union and Israel. The reason is the decision to ban 28 EU member states from funding or dealing with settlers in territories occupied by the Jewish state in 1967, according to the guidelines published in the EU’s Official Journal on Friday morning, July 19.



BRP Bhaskar
Bracing for a Modi challenge
Published on July 31, 2018 | Opinion
There is no sign of a grand alliance of opposition parties against the Narendra Modi-led Bharatiya Janata Party emerging before the next Lok Sabha elections. That, however, does not mean the BJP will benefit from the division in the opposition ranks as it did in 2014. When India embarked upon parliamentary elections on the basis of adult franchise, recognised national parties collected three-fourths of the votes polled. Regional parties’ share of votes was less than 10 per cent. Independents accounted for the rest. Over the past six decades, the national parties’ share has dwindled to about 60 per cent.

   

 
Birjees Sarwat Hussain
The information conundrum
Published on July 28, 2018 | Opinion
Do you sometimes wish that you were back in the 70s, 80s or early 90s? Okay, even if the hairdos weren’t great and the clothes were ‘padded shoulders up to here’ the music was good, the movies were good and, in my view, there was less vulgarity and less skin on display. There was also a little less information to contend with. Did you know that we are drowning in information and starving for inspiration? That is the message being sent out by stress management Gurus all over the world.


 
Musa A.Keilani
A fresh push to an old issue
Published on July 3, 2013 | Opinion
Ahead of his visit last week to the Middle East, US Secretary of State John Kerry, who has drawn up a package deal of political options to lure Israel and the Palestinians back into direct negotiations, said that it was the last chance for peace between Israel and the Palestinians. Kerry held talks with His Majesty King Abdullah II in Amman and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as well as Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in an attempt to discuss a renewal of the diplomatic process between Israel and the Palestinians.

    
 
OP Thomas
India’s year-end growth rate estimated lower due to demonetisation
Published on January 2, 2017 | Opinion
The last trading week of the year witnessed a stimulating rally as equities climbed over two per cent, leading to speculation that bulls were back. However, the buying was largely supported by domestic institutions while foreign institutional investors remained net sellers. Indices gained in three out of five sessions of the week. After falling below the psychological 26,000 level at the onset of the week, Sensex regained that mark later.

  
 
V Nagarajan
Investment norms for entering real estate development in India
Published on October 14, 2018 | Opinion
I want to enter into real estate development in India with some of our relatives and friends. I understand that investment norms have been relaxed further. Could you please provide the essential factors relating to the investment? Keshwani, Dubai.
Yes. The norms have been considerably eased now for NRIs in that the lock-in period has been removed and they can exit any time. Whereas for others, the exit is allowed only if the project is completed before the lock-in period expires. Foreign direct investment is now permitted in each phase of construction. Under the revised rules, FDI can have access irrespective of the size of the project. Earlier, the minimum size was pegged at 20,000 square metres. Yet another norm of minimum threshold limit of $5 million to be brought in within six months of commencement of business has been removed.

 
 

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